The Intern Files: Rules All Marketing Communications Should Follow

Cierra Washington, a graduate of Belhaven University, has joined us this summer to learn how to always communicate brilliantly. One of her assignments is to blog about the work she is doing and the lessons she is learning. Today, Cierra blogs on the seven top rules all marketers should know.

Good marketing communications always puts the customer’s wants and needs first. So far this summer, I’ve learned many ways to plan, write and communicate this value for businesses looking to reach their existing and future customers.

Here are the seven rules all marketing communications should follow that I learned in my time as an intern:

  1. Know your audience. Whether you are hired to write press releases, blogs or whatever, always know your audience.  When writing, you are having a conversation with the person you are writing to. It’s easier to write when you know how to talk to the person you are writing to.
  2. Listen.  Always! Even though we have ideas and love to talk in this business, listen to your clients. When you listen to your clients, you can communicate what is needed so there won’t be any confusion.
  3. Ask questions. You always want to be clear on what you have to do for your clients.  Asking questions helps you get your clients’ message out the way they want.
  4. Work harder.  We should always work hard for our clients. But, the messages we make should work harder to promote our clients and their business.
  5. Build relationships. Knowing who your customers are and their interests makes you a better communicator. If you can relate to your clients, you know what they expect, and your clients gets better results.
  6. Be involved.  Do your homework, and know what your clients are selling or promoting.  Reach out to the community, or industry in putting out your clients’ message.
  7. Have fun! All communications should be fun. If you’re not having fun in your communications, why are you doing it? Enjoy your clients, and be creative!
So…what rules do you have for marketing communications?